Apple

Apple digital-ID scheme delayed to 2022

Announced in September, the scheme will allow residents in eight US states to store state IDs and driver's licences inside the Apple Wallet app on their iPhone.

The delay follows Apple's announcement it was looking for "sole control" over how states rolled out the feature.

Reports have stated the new feature will come at a cost to the taxpayer.

     

Apple expands iPhone 12 and 12 Pro repair program due to sound issue to the UAE

If you are a user in the UAE and are experiencing this issue, you can repair your iPhone 12 for free on an Apple Store or Authorized Service Provider.

According to the Khaleej Times (via AppleInsider), the Cupertino company announced this service program in the United Arab Emirates for iPhone 12 and 12 Pro produced between October 2020 and April 2021. The statement says:

Apple to fix iPhone 13 Face ID screen repair glitch

The model contains a chip that "pairs" a screen with a specific phone and requires special software tools to "match" a new one.

Repair firms have found that without those tools, the facial-identification security function no longer works.

Apple, whose repairers use the tools, says it will issue a software update.

The feature has been widely criticised by right-to-repair advocates, who suggest it was included to limit who could repair iPhones.

The issue was first reported by iFixit, a company specialising in tools, parts and tech repair guides.

Apple iPhone 13 brings portrait mode for video

The new cinematic mode "anticipates when someone is about to enter the frame" and shifts focus to them, Apple said - something known as "pull focus".

It is the only smartphone that lets users edit this effect after shooting, Apple boss Tim Cook said.

However, most other features on the new model were incremental updates over previous versions.

The event was also overshadowed by news of a new security flaw in Apple devices which could expose users' messages.

Apple delays plan to scan iPhones for child abuse

It follows widespread criticism from privacy groups and others, worried that the on-device tracking set a dangerous precedent.

Apple said that it had listened to the negative feedback and was reconsidering.

There were concerns the system could be abused by authoritarian states.

The so-called NeuralHash technology would have scanned images just before they are uploaded to iCloud Photos. Then it would have matched them against known child sexual abuse material on a database maintained by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

Apple censors engraving service, report claims

Citizen Lab said it had investigated filters set up for customers who wanted something engraved on a new iPhone, iPad or other Apple device.

And Apple had a broad list of censored words, not just in mainland China but also in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Apple said its systems "ensure local laws and customs are respected".

"As with everything at Apple, the process for engraving is led by our values," chief privacy officer Jane Horvath wrote in a letter provided to CitizenLab in advance of the publication of its report.

Apple delays return to office as Covid cases rise

The iPhone-maker had intended to bring workers in for three days a week from September but this had now been put back until at least October, the news agency said.

Sources told Bloomberg employees would be given at least a month's notice before having to return.

BBC News has asked Apple for comment.

Apple's plans for a return to the office had been met with firm opposition from some staff.

In June, chief executive Tim Cook sent a company-wide memo telling workers they would have to return to their desks.

Apple pays millions in iPhone-repair explicit photo case

Explicit images and videos were uploaded to Facebook and other places, and made to look as if they had been posted by her.

Apple was not named in the lawsuit but its involvement came to light in an unrelated case.

It has now confirmed the incident and apologised.

In a statement, Apple said: "We take the privacy and security of our customers' data extremely seriously and have a number of protocols in place to ensure data is protected throughout the repair process.

Apple to face Epic Games in court

The trial begins on Monday - and is one of the most important in Apple's history.

Apple boss Tim Cook will be giving evidence, the first time he's given testimony at a trial.

At stake is the future of the App Store and the amount it charges developers - a wildly lucrative money spinner for the company.

In August last year, Epic Games laid a trap for Apple.

Its hit game Fortnite implemented its own in-app payment - bypassing Apple's 30% charges.

Apple promptly kicked Epic Games off the App Store.

But Epic Games was waiting for just that.

Apple charged over 'anti-competitive' app policies

European Commission anti-trust regulator Margrethe Vestager tweeted that "consumers are losing out".

It relates to charges brought two years ago by music streaming app Spotify which claimed that Apple was stifling innovation in that industry.

Apple faces a large fine and may be forced to change its policies if its arguments do not convince regulators.

Previously it has denied any wrong-doing.