Wuhan

WHO team probing origin of virus arrives in China

The long-awaited probe comes after months of negotiations between the WHO and Beijing.

A group of 10 scientists is set to interview people from research institutes, hospitals and the seafood market linked to the initial outbreak.

Covid-19 was first detected in Wuhan in central China in late 2019.

The team's arrival on Thursday morning coincides with a resurgence of new coronavirus cases in the north of the country, while life in Wuhan is relatively back to normal.

China jails citizen journalist for Wuhan reports

Zhang Zhan was found guilty of "picking quarrels and provoking trouble", a frequent charge against activists.

The 37-year-old former lawyer was detained in May, and has been on hunger strike for several months. Her lawyers say she is in poor health.

Zhang is one of several citizen journalists who have run into trouble for reporting on Wuhan.

There is no free media in China and authorities are known to clamp down on activists or whistleblowers seen as undermining the government's response to the outbreak.

WHO to investigate virus origins in China's Wuhan

Beijing has been reluctant to agree to an independent inquiry and it has taken many months of negotiations for the WHO to be allowed access to the city.

The virus is thought to have come from a market in the city selling animals.

But the search for the source has led to tensions, notably with the US.

President Donald Trump's administration has accused China of trying to conceal the initial outbreak.

What is the aim of the investigation?

Wuhan draws up plans to test all 11 million residents

The plan appears to be in its early stages, with all districts in Wuhan told to submit details as to how testing could be done within 10 days.

It comes after Wuhan, where the virus first emerged, recorded six new cases over the weekend.

Prior to this, it had seen no new cases at all since 3 April.

Wuhan, which was in strict lockdown for 11 weeks, began re-opening on 8 April.

Wuhan not as dangerous as reported, according to Fijian student

Varun Kapoor said misinformation about the deadly coronavirus is spreading as fast as the disease.

He said an epidemic of fake news is appearing online and people need to be cautious about what they hear and read on social media.

"It's not like a complete lockdown. I still go out, take my regular afternoon walks for an hour and come back to my dormitory. I go for regular shopping."

"There's this misconception. I think the media has painted Wuhan as zombieland - that is not actually the case," he said.