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Trump sues Twitter, Google and Facebook alleging 'censorship'

The class action lawsuit also targets the three companies' CEOs.

Mr Trump was suspended from his social accounts in January over public safety concerns in the wake of the Capitol riots, led by his supporters.

On Wednesday, Mr Trump called the lawsuit "a very beautiful development for our freedom of speech".

In a news conference from his golf resort in Bedminster, New Jersey, Mr Trump railed against social media companies and Democrats, who he accused of espousing misinformation.

Facebook developing smartwatch with AR control

Reports claimed the device was due for release in mid-2022 and would feature multiple cameras.

But a senior Facebook executive said the smartwatch was in only its early stages - and may never be released to the public.

"We're investing in technologies across the board... research doesn't always lead to product development," he said.

The watch's existence was revealed by technology news website the Verge, which cited anonymous sources familiar with its development.

Facebook and Google 'failed to remove scam adverts'

Google had failed to remove 34% of the scam adverts reported to it, compared with 26% at Facebook, the study indicated.

Both companies said they removed fraudulent adverts, which are banned on their platforms.

But Which? said a more proactive approach was needed.

The report also found:

15% of those surveyed had fallen victim to a scam advert and reported it

of these, 27% had been on Facebook and 19% on Google

43% of victims did not report the scam to the technology companies

Facebook faces mass legal action over data leak

About 530 million people had some personal information leaked, including, in some cases, phone numbers.

A digital privacy group is preparing to take a case to the Irish courts on behalf of EU citizens affected.

Facebook denies wrongdoing, saying the data was "scraped" from publicly available information on the site.

Antoin Ó Lachtnain, director of Digital Rights Ireland (DRI), warned other tech giants its move could be the beginning of a domino effect.

"This will be the first mass action of its kind but we're sure it won't be the last," he said.

Users can appeal Facebook's editorial decisions

Previously the board only heard appeals from users about content they felt had been unfairly removed - or referrals which came from Facebook itself.

The board has the power to overrule Facebook's original content decisions.

Its 20 members include former Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt and ex-Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger.

Anyone can submit content to the board for re-review, providing it has been reported to Facebook in the first instance.

Google, Facebook Twitter grilled in US on fake news

This latest hearing is the first since the storming of the US Capitol.

Politicians believe that was a tipping point for greater regulation.

They have said they plan to change the legislation that protects online platforms from liability for content posted by third parties.

The session began in combative style with the chair Mike Doyle asking all three executives whether they felt they bore responsibility for the events in Washington. None were prepared to give a one word "yes" or "no" answer as he demanded.

Facebook to pay News Corp for content in Australia

The deal has been secured just weeks after Australia passed a controversial world-first law aimed at making tech platforms pay for news content.

News Corp has not disclosed the value of the three-year contract in Australia. Last month, it clinched a global deal with Google.

Mr Murdoch's media empire began with his Australian newspapers.

The deal covers all of News Corp's content in the country - which is a significant amount.

Facebook reverses ban on news pages in Australia

The tech giant has blocked news to Australians on its platform since last Thursday amid a dispute over a proposed law which would force it and Google to pay news publishers for content.

Australian Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg had told him the ban would end "in the coming days", after the pair had talks.

Mr Frydenberg said amendments would be made to the law.

"Facebook has re-friended Australia," he told reporters in Canberra on Tuesday.

Facebook to block Australian users from viewing or sharing news

Australia wants tech giants like Facebook and Google to pay for the content reposted from news outlets.

The social media giant said the proposed law "fundamentally misunderstands the relationship between our platform and publishers".

Australia previously called Facebook's threats of such a ban "misconceived".

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) says it drew up the new rules to "level the playing field" between the tech giants and publishers.

The Australian government says it will put the legislation to a vote in the coming weeks.

Facebook sued for 'losing control' of users’ data

The alleged failings were revealed in the Cambridge Analytica scandal, where harvested data was used for advertising during elections.

Journalist Peter Jukes, leading the action, claims his data was compromised.

Facebook told BBC News there was “no evidence" UK or EU users’ data had been transferred to Cambridge Analytica.

But the case against the technology giant, expected to last for at least three years, will argue a “loss of control” over users' personal data warrants individual compensation.