Entertainment

X Factor is back (with a bit of de javu)

There are fewer live shows this year, with more episodes focusing on auditions and bootcamp stages.

Also, Simon Cowell is encouraging entrants to perform more original songs during their auditions.

But despite these changes, some of what the stars of the show have been saying sounds remarkably familiar.

Here's what Louis Walsh, Nicole Scherzinger and Dermot O'Leary had to say - and how they caused a minor sense of deja vu.

This will be the best year ever for The X Factor

The drama school out to break glass ceilings

Identity School of Acting started in London in 2003 with just 10 aspiring actors who wanted to make their mark.

Oguns didn't want to waste time on producers in the UK who didn't want to use his actors. So he ventured off to Hollywood, taking Boyega with him.

While there was still buzz around Boyega's first film Attack the Block, Oguns self-funded a trip to Los Angeles.

"Femi pushed me and we chased the dream together," says Boyega. "I had used up all my money for this trip and he had funded me and put all his faith into me.

Tom Hardy's bedtime story tribute to dog

The actor will read Fleabag by Helen Stephens, which is about the friendship between a young boy and his scruffy pet.

He recorded the story last year with Woody next to him and says the broadcast will be a fitting mark of respect to the memory of his dog.

Tom Hardy spoke about his loss in an emotional blog at the time.

Dropping beats not bombs

"It happened quite a number of times that a friend or colleague was killed," he says. "Fortunately I still have my fingers and toes."

Samhat cleared mines in the south of Lebanon, the home nation of his parents before they moved to Los Angeles, California, where he was born. He also supervised teams in Sudan, Cyprus and Kosovo.

Yet away from this perilous work, Samhat was grafting at another passion that has since become his life -- dropping beats for music fans across the Lebanese capital, Beirut, and promoting local musical talent.

How to start your own music festival

Putting on a music festival might sound like the dream job, but with more events appearing each year how do you make sure yours takes off?

Newsbeat speaks to the people behind three festivals which have sprung up from nothing in the past decade or so.

They give us their tips for doing it yourself.

Picking your team

"My number one tip is don't go into business with your mates," laughs James Scarlett.

Eleven years ago he teamed up with friends Simon, Andy, Brendan, Rob and Mark to found 2000 Trees festival in Gloucestershire.

Actress wants to 'lift the veil' on porn

The star says she wanted to look at people's online relationships but insists the show isn't a hatchet job.

"The intention is not to present this skewed, manipulative story or to get people to not enter porn," she says.

"The intention was to lift the veil, pull the curtain back on the industry, that really thrives from secrecy."

The six-part documentary is the follow-up to Rashida Jones's 2015 documentary, Hot Girls Wanted.

Radiohead quit Coachella stage twice after technical problems

The band faced complete sound failures along with episodes of audio feedback.

"Can you actually hear me now?" Thom Yorke asked crowds when he returned to the stage for the second time.

"I'd love to tell you a joke, lighten the mood, something like that. But this is Radiohead..."

The live stream audio was also affected by sound problems.

The first sound drop-out occurred during Ful Stop, reports Pitchfork.

Comedian Charlie Murphy dies following leukemia battle

Murphy was 57.

A long time comic, Murphy rose to fame for his work on Dave Chapelle's popular "Chapelle's Show," where he was a co-star and writer.

His recurring skit "Charlie Murphy's True Hollywood Stories," which recalled celebrity encounters he and his younger brother Eddie Murphy had with Rick James, Prince and others, became cult hits.

How Ed Sheeran helped Harry Styles with Debut

"I played him a few songs after the album was finished," Harry told the Radio 1 Breakfast Show.

"He didn't say that he didn't like any but he did like one song that isn't on the album."

Ignoring the advice of one of the most successful singer-songwriters might not be a good idea, but Harry says he still decided to leave it off the album.

"He [Ed] is really good - he's one of the most talented dudes I know," he said.

First look at 'Dirty Dancing' remake

A few of the actors in ABC's remake of the beloved 1987 film are sharing some scenes from the project on Instagram.

Abigail Breslin and Colt Prattes have taken on the roles of Frances "Baby" Houseman and Johnny Castlee originally made famous by Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze in the hit film.

Breslin posted photos of her and Prattes dancing in character.

"Casually dancing around a fireplace, as one does," she wrote in a caption. "AND just casually dippin' around a fireplace. As one also does. #sneakpeek #dirtydancing."