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Ohio prison inmates 'built computers and hid them in ceiling'

They then hid them in the ceiling of a training room.

Investigators found software, pornography and articles about making drugs and explosives on the machines.

The discovery came after IT staff flagged unusual levels of internet activity on a contractor's account.

The PCs were found in 2015 but the case has only just been made public.

A report on the incident has been published by the Ohio Inspector General's Office and forwarded to the Ohio Ethics Commission and local officials.

California lawmakers want to mandate internet for kids in juvy

But youth in the criminal justice and foster care systems often don't have access to it. That's why some lawmakers in California want to make it their right.

Earlier this year, Democrat Assemblymember Mike Gipson introduced legislation that would mandate "reasonable access to computer technology and the internet" for kids in juvenile detention programs and foster care.

Man marks his ex-girlfriend's apology letter and sends it back to her

Nick Lutz decided to get a red marker out and critique the four-page note before sending it back to his former lover.

He told Newsbeat: "We started dating in February of last year and dated for about eight months.

"Four months in she started hiding her phone and I heard she had code names for guys in her contacts list."

Nick who studies at the University of Central Florida, says he received the apology, shortly after calling time on the relationship.

He starts off by saying the introduction is too long and that there's lots of repetition.

Facebook, Google to help fight fake news ahead of French elections

Google and Facebook are partnering with journalists to help prevent fake news stories from spreading during France's presidential election.

Google News Lab and the non-profit First Draft News have launched a verification project called "CrossCheck" that will help French newsrooms identify and quickly debunk hoaxes, rumors and other false claims.

At least 17 major news organizations are taking part in the project, including Le Monde, Agence France-Presse (AFP), Liberation, BuzzFeed and France Medias Monde, which manages Radio France Internationale and TV station France 24.

Anti-establishment website launched

I can reveal that Westmonster is co-owned by Michael Heaver, former press adviser to Nigel Farage. The 27-year-old, who together with Mr Banks will own 50% of the website, will edit it day to day.

Modelled on the Drudge Report, the American aggregator site that generates huge traffic, Westmonster will be powered by the social media reach of Leave.EU, the campaign to which Mr Banks gave close to £7m - the largest donation in British political history.

Brexit case campaigner gets online death, rape threats

A look at Twitter also reveals a catalog of racist and sexist abuse against Miller, whose legal action thwarted the UK government's plans to trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty -- starting the formal process of Britain leaving the European Union -- without a vote in Parliament.

Why are Facebook users checking in here?

By Monday, hundreds of thousands of people had checked in at Standing Rock Indian Reservation on the social networking site.

But many of them weren't anywhere near the location where demonstrators have been picketing the controversial $3.7 billion pipeline.

A post circulating on Facebook gave one possible explanation for the surge in activity, claiming that the mass check-ins were organized to prevent local law enforcement from tracking protesters on social media.

The sheriff's department denied that accusation on Monday, calling it "absolutely false."

The dos and don'ts of posting about your kid online

It occurs when parents share details about their children's lives online, and there are some benefits to "sharenting." Some say they discuss parenting on social media to feel less alone and others post about their family to stay connected with their loved ones.

However, there are potential harms that come with "sharenting" too, that many parents might not recognize, according to new research.

Irish women 'access abortion pills online'

Data provided by Women on the Web, which offers abortion pills online, showed 5,650 women from both countries accessed the service from 2010 to 2015.

Most already have at least one child and a majority said taking the pills had been the right choice for them.

Laws in both countries ban or restrict access to abortion.

Abortion is legal in both countries if the mother's life it at risk. In Northern Ireland, it may also be permitted to preserve her physical or mental health.

Why being offline is overrated

By the time YouTurn CEO Mark Babbitt saw the tweet three hours later, still nobody had responded. Dismayed, Babbitt fired off an email to his staff that began: “How could we let this happen?”

Fortunately, it wasn’t anything major, just a technical question about the website for YouTurn, which helps students find internships. But it was at that point that Babbitt realised he needed to figure out a balance — for himself and his employees. Could he really chastise his staff for not being available every minute, night and day?