Hong Kong protests

Hong Kong protest march descends into violence

Police used water cannon, tear gas and truncheons, reportedly removing masks from demonstrators they arrested, and a number of people were injured.

Tens of thousands of protesters had turned out in the rain, spurred to act by a ban on wearing masks at rallies.

The controversial ban was upheld by the High Court on Sunday.

It was introduced by chief executive Carrie Lam who invoked powers dating back to colonial rule by the British.

Petrol bombs and water cannon used in clashes in Hong Kong

The violence broke out after thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators marched in defiance of a police ban.

Earlier hundreds rallied outside the British Consulate, demanding the UK press China to maintain freedoms guaranteed during the 1997 handover.

Months of unrest were sparked by a now-scrapped extradition bill.

It would have made it possible for people in Hong Kong to be extradited to mainland China, where critics say they could face human rights abuses.

Hong Kong police fire gun and use water cannon on protesters

Images show several other officers also pointed guns at protesters who were chasing them with sticks and poles.

In another first, police deployed water cannon against protesters earlier in the day.

The protests began in the city's Tsuen Wan district and have since spread to the district of Tsim Sha Tsui.

Demonstrations were sparked by an extradition bill but have since morphed into broader anti-government protests, and developments on Sunday mark a serious escalation in the unrest.

Twitter and Facebook remove Chinese accounts

Twitter said it removed 936 accounts it said were being used to “sow political discord in Hong Kong”.

The network said the accounts originated in mainland China and were part of a coordinated attempt to undermine the “legitimacy and political positions of the protest movement”.

Facebook said it had, after being tipped off by Twitter, removed "seven Pages, three Groups and five Facebook accounts.”

Hong Kong protests cripple airport for second day

Squads of riot police arrived shortly before midnight after thousands of demonstrators again flooded the terminal buildings during the day.

Flight departures were brought to a standstill amid scuffles.

At least three men were mobbed inside the airport by protesters.

They were said to be holding identity cards showing they were police officers from mainland China.

Hong Kong police have admitted deploying officers disguised as anti-government protesters during the unrest in the city.