French Polynesia

More residents repatriated to Tahiti after Covid-19 wait in France

The French High Commission said the chartered Air Tahiti Nui plane carried, apart from freight, returning residents and members of mobile police squad who would be quarantined in the barracks.

Four more such flights are planned until the end of June when scheduled airline services are expected to resume.

Hundreds of residents remain stranded in France, with no additional plans to accelerate their return.

Meanwhile, the government eased restrictions on the sale of alcohol so designated wine shop and liquor outlets can open except for Sunday afternoons.

French Polynesia curfew extended to 29 April

The French High Commissioner Dominique Sorain made the announcement at a briefing with the French Polynesian president Edouard Fritch.

The curfew, which was first declared on 27 March, applies between 8pm and 5am.

Mr Sorain said the restrictions were needed because of the steady but slow progression of the virus which to date has infected 51 people in French Polynesia.

He said an Air Tahiti Nui airliner chartered by the French government was due to return from Paris at the weekend, bringing in 25 tonnes of medical supplies.

French Polynesia Covid-19 cases now at 36

There has been another confirmed Covid-19 infection in French Polynesia, raising the total to 36.

One of the carriers is in hospital care.

The latest update shows that for two consecutive days there has been an increase of the tally by just one.

The person who tested positive on Rangiroa was to be transferred to Tahiti which has the majority of cases.

     

French Polynesia Covid-19 tally rises to 34

The update from the government said the hospitalisation rate is unchanged with one person in care.

Last night a curfew was declared for the first time, forcing residents across all islands to stay indoor from 8pm to 5am.

The curfew will be in place until 15 April, and anyone caught breaching it can be fined at least $US150 and risks one year in prison.

The curfew was foreshadowed last weekend when movements were restricted, and the public was warned of a possible complete lockdown.

Visits at French Polynesia's prisons suspended

The French High Commission said inmates would instead be allotted phone time to communicate with their friends and families.

The High Commission said some inmates might be released early, but that would not be considered if the individual was a risk to the public.

Last month, France was found guilty in the European Court of Human Rights of breaching the human rights of prisoners in Tahiti by treating them in a degrading manner.

Tahiti tourist exodus continues amid flight cancellations

The French High Commission in French Polynesia said since last Friday a total of 2600 tourists had been able to fly out of Tahiti.

This Friday, a last flight bound for France is scheduled to take off before regular services are suspended until at least late April.

The High Commission said since the start of the crisis an air bridge set up with the domestic carrier Air Tahiti had allowed 2,500 holiday makers to fly from the outer islands back to Tahiti.

French Polynesian Covid-19 cases climb to 23

An update was given by president Edouard Fritch, who told the public broadcaster that among the five is education minister Christelle Lehartel.

She has been in isolation for a week.

Mr Fritch also warned that a curfew may be declared because too many people flout the restrictions put in place at the weekend in an effort to curb the spread of the disease.

There had been cases of people being out without the required attestation allowing their movement, he said.

There had also been instances of people meeting up in defiance of existing orders.

Sixth Covid-19 case in Tahiti, two in New Caledonia

Earlier in the day, the authorities said there was one case in Moorea and one in Tahiti.

In an updated statement, the government said a third had been confirmed Thursday.

The individual is reported to be a European tourist who arrived two days ago.

Last week, the first tourist was hospitalised with the virus after falling ill on the atoll of Fakarava.

The French High Commissioner Dominique Sorain said access will be tightened and only residents are now allowed to enter French Polynesia.

2 more covid-19 cases in French Polynesia

One of them is a person close to the parliamentarian Maina Sage whose infection was made public yesterday.

She had returned from France at the weekend and was tested this week to become the first known coronavirus carrier in a Pacific Island country.

The other new coronavirus case concerns a Swiss tourist who fell ill on the atoll of Fakarava in the Tuamotus.

According to Tahiti Nui TV, the tourist had also arrived in French Polynesia last weekend.

The individual has been flown back to Tahiti where tests confirmed his infection.

Coronavirus: French Polynesia won't follow France in closing schools

A government spokesperson said the situation in French Polynesia, with one case, was nothing like that in metropolitan France, which had more than 2280.

The territory's member of the French National Assembly, Maine Sage, was confirmed to have Covid-19 yesterday.

It is believed she contracted the virus during a committee meeting in Paris.

Authorities are trying to track down and isolate her contacts since she returned to Tahiti last weekend.