Donald Trump

Rolling Stones warn Trump not to use their songs

A statement from the band's legal team said it was working with the performing rights organisation, the BMI, to stop the unauthorised use of their music.

The Trump campaign used the song You Can't Always Get What You Want at last week's rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

The same song was used by the Trump campaign during the 2016 US election.

"The Rolling Stones do not endorse Donald Trump," the band tweeted in 2016.

Two more Trump campaign staff members test positive

The campaign said on Saturday hours before the rally, Trump's first since March, that six members of the campaign's advance staff had tested positive.

"After another round of testing for campaign staff in Tulsa, two additional members of the advance team tested positive for the coronavirus," spokesperson Tim Murtaugh said.

"These staff members attended the rally but were wearing masks during the entire event."

Trump’s Tulsa rally fails to draw expected crowds amid virus fears

Mr Trump had boasted earlier this week that almost a million people had requested tickets for the event at Tulsa's Bank of Oklahoma Center.

But the 19,000-seat arena was far from full and plans for him to address an outside "overflow" area were abandoned.

There had been concerns about holding the rally during the pandemic.

Those attending the rally had to sign a waiver protecting the Trump campaign from responsibility for any illness. Hours before the event began, officials said six staff members involved in organising the rally had tested positive.

Trump told to back off Seattle's Chaz police-free zone

Governor Jay Inslee said Mr Trump should stay out of the state's business, and Seattle's mayor said any invasion of the city would be illegal.

Police abandoned a precinct there on Monday after days of clashes.

Mr Trump said the area had been overtaken by "domestic terrorists".

Since police withdrew, demonstrations in the area have been largely peaceful.

It has been called Chaz, an abbreviation of Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone. Hundreds of people have been gathering there to demonstrate, hear speeches and attend events.

Trump threatens to send in army to end unrest

He said if cities and states failed to control the protests and "defend their residents" he would deploy the army and "quickly solve the problem for them".

Protests over the death of George Floyd are entering their seventh day.

As Mr Trump spoke at the White House, police cleared protesters from a nearby park with tear gas and rubber bullets.

The president then crossed the park and posed next to a damaged church, provoking widespread criticism from those who accused him of aggressively targeting the peaceful demonstrators in aid of a photo opportunity.

Coronavirus: Trump warns US death toll could hit 100,000

Speaking at a two-hour virtual "town hall", Mr Trump also denied that his administration had acted too slowly.

More than 67,000 people have already died with Covid-19 in the US.

But Mr Trump expressed optimism about the development of a vaccine, saying one would be ready by the end of this year - although public health experts believe it will take 12 to 18 months.

President Donald Trump says US to halt World Health Organisation funding

He says had the WHO done its job to get medical experts into China, the Covid-19 coronavirus outbreak could have been contained.

"I am directing my administration to halt funding while a review is conducted to access the World Health Organisation's role in severely mismanaging and covering up the spread of the coronavirus," Trump said.

"The WHO failed in its basic duty and it must be held accountable...

"Many countries said they were going to listen to the WHO and they have problems now the likes of which they cannot believe," Trump said.

'Millions' of Americans could be infected with coronavirus, expert warns

Dr Anthony 

Donald Trump declares Covid-19 coronavirus a US national emergency

Trump made the announcement at a Rose Garden news conference.

Trump said he was declaring the national emergency in order to "unleash the full power of the federal government."

He urged every state to set up emergency centers to help fight the virus.

The declaration enabled the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to assist state and local governments and coordinate the US response to the crisis. The virus has killed 41 people in the United States.

All travel from Europe to US suspended for 30 days

But he said the "strong but necessary" restrictions would not apply to the UK, where 460 cases of the virus have now been confirmed.

There are 1135 confirmed cases of the virus across the US, with 38 deaths.

"To keep new cases from entering our shores, we will be suspending all travel from Europe to the United States for the next 30 days," Trump said.

"The new rules will go into effect Friday at midnight," he added.

"We are marshalling the full power of the federal government and the private sector to protect the American people," he said.